Installing openSUSE Krypton: an always-updated KDE distro

opensuse grub boot options

I think this is the most reasonable decision for me to install openSUSE (again in another device) in triple-boot with Fedora and Windows. Since I cannot abandon Fedora just like that, for it has created so many awesome memories. LOL, I’m joking. Actually I still have an on-going work in Fedora that I have no intention to move it to openSUSE. Besides, the LVM partition contents of Fedora where my data resides couldn’t be displayed by YaST when I installed openSUSE with Krypton Live ISO. So, I couldn’t just replace the Fedora root partition with openSUSE and then mount the separated home partition.

Screenshot_20180217_203552

The most time-consuming process is partitioning. I had to decide which partition should I “sacrifice” for openSUSE. I didn’t want resize existing partition and created one from it. So, the other option was to replace Fedora, but it’s kind of hard for me. Fortunately, there was a not-so-important NTFS partition and a “Windows recovery” partition that were fairly enough to use. So I came up with deleting both partition for the installation.

I was using Krypton live ISO which only 1 GB in size, unlike the official Tumbleweed ISO that has 4++ GB size. I thought that in such size, it would install only the essential software. But actually, since YaST asked for internet connection, it downloaded updates up to 4 GB! And during the download process, WiFi disconnected, which stopped the process.

Screenshot_20180218_032642After reconnecting a few times, eventually the download process continued. But, there were still some problems. There were some packages that failed to download. I was sure that during the installation, there were updates in the repo as well. As Krypton is always-updated KDE build, which means every single Git push, there will be updates available. So I skipped a few packages, and the installation could be finished. But, after I restarted the laptop and booted up to openSUSE, I got IceWM desktop instead. Yeah, it’s because the essential plasma-desktop and plasma-session were failed to download, or has been updated then.

Fortunately, YaST software installer recorded what missed out from the installation process. It suggested me to download the missing packages as soon as I open it for the first time. So after finishing the installation, I relogin, and finally KDE was here. Frankly, the desktop feels smoother than my Fedora. I wonder what causes it. Whether it’s relatively new installation or my Fedora KDE has been bloated with background programs. Let’s see if openSUSE will still like this until some time onward. 🙂

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