Removing Expiration Date of Oracle Express Database

oracle_sqlplus

I currently work on a project that uses Oracle database. For the local development, I installed it with Docker. I’ve found a handy docker file of Oracle Database Express Edition 11g published by wnameless in Github or in the official page in Docker Hub.

It’s so easy to use, that I just need to type sudo docker start oracle to get it up and running. Of course by reading the Readme first.

But then I noticed an error: ORA-28002: the password will expire within 7 days. Although it doesn’t affect the app, I feel a bit annoyed. So I googled it, and found the solution afterward. But I lost the URL. My bad!

Just take a look at above picture. I won’t type in the command here, as you can found it somewhere in Stackoverflow, actually. 😀

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Oh-my-zsh, Tmux, Vim

Screenshot_20171008_054737
My Konsole as of October 2017

This time, I want to share my dotfiles of my new toys: zsh, tmux and vim at once. I’ve  found out what’s tmux actually, a couple of days ago by asking to a Telegram channel, @vimid. It’s “terminal multiplexer”, some kind of, it can break your single terminal session into multiple sessions.1 So, if I made use of Konsole tabs to use vim and php artisan serve of Laravel at a time then, now I just need tmux to run them concurrently.

Oh-my-zsh

What I know about zsh is not more than a console shell for macOS, before. Although, I did realize that it’s included in every Linux distributions as well. So, I thought I wouldn’t touch it no matter what. 😀

But this is my turning point to change my idealism. 😀 I just installed it, little bit configuring, and set it as bash replacement to Konsole. Umm, am I now look like a half macOS user? 😀

So, for zsh, I installed oh-my-zsh plugin and did some tweaks for the look of the prompt. I wanted a Powerline-like look, but I didn’t want to use Powerline. So, I installed powelevel9k theme instead. And now, I’m very satisfied, as it looks much nicer than my previous console.

Tmux

I don’t configure tmux much, since I just know it not that long. I thought it was just like bash or other console shells. As I had been trying it once, one day. I run it, and nothing appeared other than a command line shell. And I just realized how it works lately. 😀

In my config, I don’t do more than set default shell to zsh, and install tmux-powerline-theme with tpm.

Vim

As for vim, I have known it for quite long time. The first time I used it, like many developers out there, I didn’t know how to exit. 😀

But yeah, slowly but sure, I somehow have a little knowledge how to handle it. I have configured it quite seriously as I use it for my daily need: coding. But still, I’d say, I haven’t got its full usability yet, as I mentioned this before.  Just check out my .vimrc below, in case you so curious for what plugins I installed.


  1.  https://fedoramagazine.org/use-tmux-more-powerful-terminal/ 

Farewell OpenShift 2

It’s 3 days after the End of Life of OpenShift 2. As I posted earlier about the notice, I had migrated my little app to its next generation: OpenShift Online 3. My app is the basis of my personal website and the backend of my Android app. So it’s kind of a must for me to migrate it as soon as possible. And actually I did it successfully last week.

As I deploy it by Git, I still have the source repository. So, I don’t care of the deployed one on the OpenShift. But, once I received an email from OpenShift about the “one time exception” to allow me to backup the data even after its end of life, I think it’s worth trying. 😀

Screenshot_20171004-072146

So, I just followed the guide from attached link. Then a few moments after I typed rhc snapshot save php, I got my deployed source of the app, including error logs of Nginx and PHP.

Screenshot_20171004_073342

And now I feel so relieve of the data –if it will be deleted forever. Farewell, my –prior– app.

KDE: Like no other

I had lately just realized that I lost something crucial from KDE. Something that took me to love it, ’till now. It’s the built-in Hijra calendar system in Plasma desktop, which was included in (at least until) KDE SC 4.x.

kde9
Screenshot taken at a few years earlier

But, since KDE Plasma 5 rolled out, I was so excited for its fresh new look that I almost forgot about the Hijra calendar widget which I used to see. Perhaps it was still in beta phase, then. So, I didn’t take it into account. But, until now, it hasn’t appeared yet.

Then suddenly I wanted to switch KDE with any other DE in my Fedora because of the lack of Hijri calendar. I’ve tried –only– LXQt then. Still, GNOME is not my choice, I don’t know either. But it didn’t last longer. My soul has apparently been connected and felt comfort to KDE. It’s like irreplaceable in my heart. Just like you, my dear. 🙂

KDE Plasma meets new dock

A few days earlier, I wanted a fresh look for my Plasma desktop, and I want a macOS-like interface. So, I googled for “dock” app for latest Plasma version. And eventually I ended up to choose Latte-Dock plasma widget. The last chance I customized KDE to resemble macOS look, I made use of Daisy plasma widget. But since it’s not developed any more for long time, I looked for another alternative, then here comes Latte-Dock.

As I use Fedora, I just have to run dnf install latte-dock to install it. Then I need to run it through app menu launcher to have it appears on the desktop. But actually I made mistake by adding its plasma widget manually via Add widgets of Plasma desktop. I didn’t get the settings I expected like in the tutorial I’ve found then. Yesterday I found a detailed article about Latte-Dock in this link (in German).

Once it launched, it will appear in the bottom screen of plasma desktop. We can add common plasma widgets in it, too, just like in the plasma panel. Also it can be customized by settings and tweak that it provides. For me, the default settings is enough, except for the animation that I cannot obtain due to the lack of performance of my video graphic driver.

In addition to dock app, I also move the default plasma panel to the top of screen. Then I removed the Icon-only Task Manager widget, and added Global Menu widget. Yeah, fortunately there is a global menu widget that is provided by Plasma desktop. But I also need to choose a settings somewhere in the system settings in order that the global menu widget shows application menu.

I also mixed and match other widgets to customize my plasma to look close enough like macOS. The final result is as follow:

Screenshot_20170910_093408
My KDE Plasma desktop as of September

 

Learning with fun

I mostly learn English on Thursdays, by trying to follow hashtag #kamisinggris that I found it couple of times in IG timeline of @ridwankamil. The sources of learning are vary and easy to find as I live in internet era. Today I found an interesting Youtube channel, and I’d like to share it here about a video from it.

The channel is Japanese Ammo with Misa, that it’s actually a channel for learning Japanese. But by the videos from this channel, I can learn two languages at once: Japanese as well as English, as the channel owner speaks English in her videos. And yeah, I learn Japanese as well, anyway.

The video I just found is this:

Learn Japanese through the lyrics of zen-zen-zense (Kimi no Na wa OST.)

Misa-sensei explains the meaning of lyrics line by line in details. She translates every words and phrases of the lyrics with comprehensive explanation. For instance, she tells us about usage of word “boku”. This is the most interesting part for me. Because I’ve just understood that the word actually sounds cute, weak, and kind of poetic in this situation (song lyrics).

I usually use the word “boku” when I try to make a sentence in Japanese, and then I post it to FB status. I mostly hear the word from songs, just like the song in the video. As Misa-sensei explains, the word is kind of poetic, that it make sense to use in a song. But I also often hear the word in anime or dorama. And yes, I realized that it’s kind of a casual word when used in shows.

In addition, there are a few expressions that I’ve never learnt before, that Misa-sensei explains in the video. Besides, learning language with a song is quite exciting as well. The video will guide you through another way of learning Japanese with fun. So, if you are also learning Japanese, just check out the video. And have fun.

Hello, Vim!

Yeah, eventually I’ve got a chance to meet Vim more intensively from now on. Who is she? No worries! She is not a girl nor a lady. You’re still the one for me. 😀

“Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.” That’s how she describes herself. 1 So, basically Vim is a text editor. Period.

Then, comes a question, why Vim? Umm, frankly, it’s hot lately. I wonder how awesome it is. And yes, it is. Also, considering my needs of text (code) editing, and the hardware spec I have, I think Vim worth trying. Initially I have Atom, as I want something more legal than Sublime Text, that often (I mean always) remind me to purchase it. But with a lot of plugins I installed, it became more laggy. So I broke my idealism to avoid ST, and make use of it instead, until now sometimes. But ST is quite memory-greedy for my 2 gigs laptop, that I also regularly needs browser to run hand in hand while coding. I’m a coder by the way. 😀

Then the hero eventually came in. It’s Vim that now becomes my main text editor. Although I just already use it intensively since 2 or 3 weeks earlier. In other words, I am still getting used to it as a newbie Vim-er, of course. So I haven’t found it’s real hidden magic either. I’m sure with consistency and persistence, I’ll have it’s main enticement: productivity. And for now, I have to get along with her more. Wish me luck. 😀

Speaking of which, I use Vim in my Fedora KDE Spin, and run it in the beloved Konsole app. Here’s my screenshot of Vim.

Screenshot_20170816_101047.png
Vim with NERDTree plugin, makes it looks like GUI-based text editor with left pane