Just been released: Fedora 27

Fedora fans all over the world have just excited for the release of the new version, Fedora 27. As usual, the the version brings several fixes and improvements as well as adds some new features.

Nevertheless, though, as for KDE spin, it’s likely there’s nothing really fresh in this new version of Fedora. From above screencast I found on youtube, we can see that the version of Plasma is 5.10.5, which is not the latest one: 5.11 that has new couple of brand new stuffs like the new Systemsettings UI design and Wayland support. But on the other hand, F27 KDE has the newest Qt version shipped, i.e 5.9.1 –nearly the newest one though.

As I wrote this post, I was in upgrading process. By the way, I started switching to Fedora since the version 23 back then. And I have successfully passed 3 times of upgrade processes, not by reinstalling a new ISO image. So, I feel so courageous to just upgrade it by DNF system-upgrade. Even though I need to download 2,4 GB of new packages!

Screenshot_20171115_155502
Upgrade process of Fedora 27

 

 

Screenshot_20171116_011020
Eventually… download finished, and then wait for the installation

Steps to upgrade

According to Fedora Magazine guide to upgrading Fedora 26 to 27, these are the DNF commands:

  1. sudo dnf upgrade --refresh
  2. sudo dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade
  3. sudo dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=27
  4. sudo dnf system-upgrade reboot
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KDE Plasma meets new dock

A few days earlier, I wanted a fresh look for my Plasma desktop, and I want a macOS-like interface. So, I googled for “dock” app for latest Plasma version. And eventually I ended up to choose Latte-Dock plasma widget. The last chance I customized KDE to resemble macOS look, I made use of Daisy plasma widget. But since it’s not developed any more for long time, I looked for another alternative, then here comes Latte-Dock.

As I use Fedora, I just have to run dnf install latte-dockĀ to install it. Then I need to run it through app menu launcher to have it appears on the desktop. But actually I made mistake by adding its plasma widget manually via Add widgets of Plasma desktop. I didn’t get the settings I expected like in the tutorial I’ve found then. Yesterday I found a detailed article about Latte-Dock in this link (in German).

Once it launched, it will appear in the bottom screen of plasma desktop. We can add common plasma widgets in it, too, just like in the plasma panel. Also it can be customized by settings and tweak that it provides. For me, the default settings is enough, except for the animation that I cannot obtain due to the lack of performance of my video graphic driver.

In addition to dock app, I also move the default plasma panel to the top of screen. Then I removed the Icon-only Task Manager widget, and added Global Menu widget. Yeah, fortunately there is a global menu widget that is provided by Plasma desktop. But I also need to choose a settings somewhere in the system settings in order that the global menu widget shows application menu.

I also mixed and match other widgets to customize my plasma to look close enough like macOS. The final result is as follow:

Screenshot_20170910_093408
My KDE Plasma desktop as of September

 

Hello, Vim!

Yeah, eventually I’ve got a chance to meet Vim more intensively from now on. Who is she? No worries! She is not a girl nor a lady. You’re still the one for me. šŸ˜€

“Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.” That’s how she describes herself. 1 So, basically Vim is a text editor. Period.

Then, comes a question, why Vim? Umm, frankly, it’s hot lately. I wonder how awesome it is. And yes, it is. Also, considering my needs of text (code) editing, and the hardware spec I have, I think Vim worth trying. Initially I have Atom, as I want something more legal than Sublime Text, that often (I mean always) remind me to purchase it. But with a lot of plugins I installed, it became more laggy. So I broke my idealism to avoid ST, and make use of it instead, until now sometimes. But ST is quite memory-greedy for my 2 gigs laptop, that I also regularly needs browser to run hand in hand while coding. I’m a coder by the way. šŸ˜€

Then the hero eventually came in. It’s Vim that now becomes my main text editor. Although I just already use it intensively since 2 or 3 weeks earlier. In other words, I am still getting used to it as a newbie Vim-er, of course. So I haven’t found it’s real hidden magic either. I’m sure with consistency and persistence, I’ll have it’s main enticement: productivity. And for now, I have to get along with her more. Wish me luck. šŸ˜€

Speaking of which, I use Vim in my Fedora KDE Spin, and run it in the beloved Konsole app. Here’s my screenshot of Vim.

Screenshot_20170816_101047.png
Vim with NERDTree plugin, makes it looks like GUI-based text editor with left pane

Get forced to wake up

Do you have a problem with your wake up time? Do you often get up too late? You deserve trying this app. Its name is Fajar Warrior Alarm, “just” an alarm app. Actually there are a lot of similar app in the PlayStore. But I choose this one for you, because it’s free (of course the others are free as well though), free of charge and free of ads, that’s the point. I hate apps that show ads so often. And luckily, there is still a generous developer who doesn’t take the user’s freedom to not showing ads in his app. I mean this alarm app.

So, what else that makes it awesome? The challenge to stop the alarm voice. You couldn’t stop the alarm, unless you type the exact same sentence (a hadith) in the input it has. Actually I searched for “math alarm” when I found this app. But unfortunately it contained ads, so I looked for another app instead. And it led me to this Fajar Warrior Alarm.

The idea is similar to the app I wanted in the first place. It won’t stop the noisy alarm until the user type in some expected text. It causes the user to use his/her fully consciousness when typing the answer. And hopefully make the user totally wake up. So curious about it? Just install it and try it on your phone. Good luck.

Making Kinetic Typography in Linux

Kinetic typography is an animation technique for moving text in certain ways. It became quite popular since a few years earlier. There are so many tutorials out there how to do kinetic typography. Almost all of them are created with After Effects (AE).

As a part of OpenSource community, I have once wondered, was there exist a similar program to do kinetic typography that runs on Linux? The answer is, yes of course, but not as powerful as AE. Actually, I’ve found Synfig Studio that has a close functionality to AE to produce kinetic typography. But, basically Synfig is a 2D animation software. Therefore, I cannot compare it with AE, after all.

TL;DR, this is a tutorial I’ve found in Youtube to do kinetic typography in Linux

And this is my rendered video

HTML5 App for Desktop Using Qt WebKit

Qt WebKit HTML5 App
Qt WebKit HTML5 App

It’s been a long time since the last time I wrote about Qt programming. This time I’d like to share my recent activity on developing the desktop version of my Android webapp, Hafal Quran. You can download it from Google Play Store by clicking this badge:
Android app on Google Play

My purpose is that the app can run on most platform. So it led me to choose HTML5 approach. And finally I come up with the app website which everyone can play it on http://hq.amzone.web.id.Ā The Android app is the first platform-specific release of Hafal Quran.

While it looks like already reaches the final version, it actually lacks an important aspect, i.e dis-connectivity. We have to connect to internet to play it. Of course we cannot play it when go offline. So now, I continue itsĀ development to the next step: offline mode.

The first development should be focused onĀ the Android version, as the usersĀ of mobile devices are the most and growing. But for now, I will make the offlineĀ versionĀ for desktopĀ first. In this case, I choose to deploy it for Ubuntu Linux distro and the derivatives, particularly Grombyang OS Edu.

Technical overview

I utilize Qt framework for the development because I have some experiences in it. Besides, I decided to use Webkit as the engine of the app. And actually it is part of Qt framework itself. Webkit is the infamous engine for most popular browser, including Safari, Chrome, and even Opera.

But unfortunately, QWebKit module is now being deprecated since Qt 5. And it is now superceded by QWebEngine module. So, for now, I will still use QWebKit module of Qt4.

The drawbacks of using Webkit is probably about the memory usage. Since Qt modules are quite greedy in terms of consumingĀ RAM.


FYI, the Android app was oneĀ of 50 apps thatĀ were selectedĀ at Finding Top50 Local Apps event, which was held by Baidu Indonesia last year.

Read EPUB in J2ME phone

Albite Reader

An e-book reader for Java Mobile developed by Svetlin Ankov. It’s free, and it’s released under the Apache 2.0 License. The source code is available at GitHub. If you are interested in the licensing info of the used resources or would like to download their sources or build your own resources, see the paragraph about resources down the text.

Works with EPUB, txt and (x)html files.

melalui Get the Reader at Albite BOOKS.