Mendeley Desktop: Linux Version

In the first day of this semester, a lecturer showed us a useful app: Mendeley. The name reminded me to something. I just remembered about library collection numbering system. But no, it’s Dewey system actually (I googled it just now). Or perhaps it’s more similar to a name of something about chemical. Umm… Mendeleev’s periodic table! Forget it! There’s nothing to do with chemical actually. It’s just an unrequited love of me. 😀

Mendeley is a reference manager and an academic social network. My lecturer showed us how he uses it to monitor the progress of his related researches over the world. It’s about economics. He also uses it as a citation manager for his papers. He showed us how easy to generate the citation from certain paper for bibliography, with just copy it from its menu and then we just need to paste it to word processing app, like MS Word.

Mendeley can be downloaded from its official page in this link. It supports all major operating systems, including Linux. For Linux itself, there are two options: for Ubuntu family and for “generic Linux”, that means a pre-compiled binary for all Linux distro variants. As I use Fedora, I chose the latter. I just had to extract the tarball, and then executed the file ./bin/mendeleydesktop either from terminal or double click the file. We need to register a free account on the Mendeley website to use this app, anyway.

mendeley linux desktop

Hey, it’s Qt-based!

I was interested to give it a try, as I saw another option to generate the citation format other than Formatted citation. They’re LaTeX custom command and BibTex entry formats. Actually I haven’t needed it yet, after all.

mendeley on fedora

Mendeley search results and copy citation format

I tried the Bibtex entry format option, as you can see from above screenshot. Then I created the .bib file manually from copied text. And then I appended the citation to the LaTeX file. Just like below screenshot.

mendeley citation bibtex

Bibtex citation format of Mendeley (note that it’s just an example text)

It’s so convenient to organized the citation using Mendeley. I start imagining to be a researcher and write some useful papers by utilizing it. 😀

 

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Herzlich willkommen, OpenSUSE!

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Wait…! That desktop looks familiar. Have I ever met it before? Umm, maybe.

I suddenly remembered about OpenSUSE, which I once wanted to give it a try, as I wrote it somewhere in my other blog. And actually when I checked the post again, it was one and a half years ago. Then recently, I got encouraged (once again 😀 ) by kang Cip to try OpenSUSE out. And yes, I ended up installing it into my PC, eventually. Note that the screenshot above is just a live session. And here is the real installation result:

boot options screen

Dual boot options of OpenSUSE Leap and Windows

From the time I posted about my desire, it means that it took a quite long time for me to eventually install OpenSUSE. That’s the first time I played around with the YaST installer of this chameleon-logo Linux distro.

Continue reading “Herzlich willkommen, OpenSUSE!”

Was succeeded installing Spotify, but…

Lately, when I was booting up to Windows, Spotify just got installed and a quite serious damage got occurred. I installed it as Groove Music suggested me to do so when I opened it and found some new changes, since Microsoft would stop their music streaming service by the end of this year. While I was streaming to a podcast, suddenly the Windows hanged. I was not so sure that Spotify was the cause, instead, I suspected some kind of bad sectors might have been infected my HDD. So, I had to hard shut it down by pressing power button, then. And when booting again, the Windows took more time than usual to load up. It made me more sure to believe at the bad sector.

Then I tried streaming again, and the Windows got frozen as well.

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A few moments before the disaster

To make me more sure that Spotify caused the system to freeze, I installed it on Fedora. And yes, it caused Fedora to freeze, too!

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Just the same in Fedora

I’m not alone in this situation. Some people find solution for this issue, but I’m not sure if it works for me too.

I don’t know what’s actually happening. But, it just quite disappointing, even though, actually I wanted to try their premium subscription, even just for the first 3 months. 😀

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Spotify premium

Just been released: Fedora 27

Fedora fans all over the world have just excited for the release of the new version, Fedora 27. As usual, the the version brings several fixes and improvements as well as adds some new features.

Nevertheless, though, as for KDE spin, it’s likely there’s nothing really fresh in this new version of Fedora. From above screencast I found on youtube, we can see that the version of Plasma is 5.10.5, which is not the latest one: 5.11 that has new couple of brand new stuffs like the new Systemsettings UI design and Wayland support. But on the other hand, F27 KDE has the newest Qt version shipped, i.e 5.9.1 –nearly the newest one though.

As I wrote this post, I was in upgrading process. By the way, I started switching to Fedora since the version 23 back then. And I have successfully passed 3 times of upgrade processes, not by reinstalling a new ISO image. So, I feel so courageous to just upgrade it by DNF system-upgrade. Even though I need to download 2,4 GB of new packages!

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Upgrade process of Fedora 27

 

 

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Eventually… download finished, and then wait for the installation

Steps to upgrade

According to Fedora Magazine guide to upgrading Fedora 26 to 27, these are the DNF commands:

  1. sudo dnf upgrade --refresh
  2. sudo dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade
  3. sudo dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=27
  4. sudo dnf system-upgrade reboot

KDE Plasma meets new dock

A few days earlier, I wanted a fresh look for my Plasma desktop, and I want a macOS-like interface. So, I googled for “dock” app for latest Plasma version. And eventually I ended up to choose Latte-Dock plasma widget. The last chance I customized KDE to resemble macOS look, I made use of Daisy plasma widget. But since it’s not developed any more for long time, I looked for another alternative, then here comes Latte-Dock.

As I use Fedora, I just have to run dnf install latte-dock to install it. Then I need to run it through app menu launcher to have it appears on the desktop. But actually I made mistake by adding its plasma widget manually via Add widgets of Plasma desktop. I didn’t get the settings I expected like in the tutorial I’ve found then. Yesterday I found a detailed article about Latte-Dock in this link (in German).

Once it launched, it will appear in the bottom screen of plasma desktop. We can add common plasma widgets in it, too, just like in the plasma panel. Also it can be customized by settings and tweak that it provides. For me, the default settings is enough, except for the animation that I cannot obtain due to the lack of performance of my video graphic driver.

In addition to dock app, I also move the default plasma panel to the top of screen. Then I removed the Icon-only Task Manager widget, and added Global Menu widget. Yeah, fortunately there is a global menu widget that is provided by Plasma desktop. But I also need to choose a settings somewhere in the system settings in order that the global menu widget shows application menu.

I also mixed and match other widgets to customize my plasma to look close enough like macOS. The final result is as follow:

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My KDE Plasma desktop as of September

 

Hello, Vim!

Yeah, eventually I’ve got a chance to meet Vim more intensively from now on. Who is she? No worries! She is not a girl nor a lady. You’re still the one for me. 😀

“Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.” That’s how she describes herself. 1 So, basically Vim is a text editor. Period.

Then, comes a question, why Vim? Umm, frankly, it’s hot lately. I wonder how awesome it is. And yes, it is. Also, considering my needs of text (code) editing, and the hardware spec I have, I think Vim worth trying. Initially I have Atom, as I want something more legal than Sublime Text, that often (I mean always) remind me to purchase it. But with a lot of plugins I installed, it became more laggy. So I broke my idealism to avoid ST, and make use of it instead, until now sometimes. But ST is quite memory-greedy for my 2 gigs laptop, that I also regularly needs browser to run hand in hand while coding. I’m a coder by the way. 😀

Then the hero eventually came in. It’s Vim that now becomes my main text editor. Although I just already use it intensively since 2 or 3 weeks earlier. In other words, I am still getting used to it as a newbie Vim-er, of course. So I haven’t found it’s real hidden magic either. I’m sure with consistency and persistence, I’ll have it’s main enticement: productivity. And for now, I have to get along with her more. Wish me luck. 😀

Speaking of which, I use Vim in my Fedora KDE Spin, and run it in the beloved Konsole app. Here’s my screenshot of Vim.

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Vim with NERDTree plugin, makes it looks like GUI-based text editor with left pane

Get forced to wake up

Do you have a problem with your wake up time? Do you often get up too late? You deserve trying this app. Its name is Fajar Warrior Alarm, “just” an alarm app. Actually there are a lot of similar app in the PlayStore. But I choose this one for you, because it’s free (of course the others are free as well though), free of charge and free of ads, that’s the point. I hate apps that show ads so often. And luckily, there is still a generous developer who doesn’t take the user’s freedom to not showing ads in his app. I mean this alarm app.

So, what else that makes it awesome? The challenge to stop the alarm voice. You couldn’t stop the alarm, unless you type the exact same sentence (a hadith) in the input it has. Actually I searched for “math alarm” when I found this app. But unfortunately it contained ads, so I looked for another app instead. And it led me to this Fajar Warrior Alarm.

The idea is similar to the app I wanted in the first place. It won’t stop the noisy alarm until the user type in some expected text. It causes the user to use his/her fully consciousness when typing the answer. And hopefully make the user totally wake up. So curious about it? Just install it and try it on your phone. Good luck.