Oh-my-zsh, Tmux, Vim

Screenshot_20171008_054737
My Konsole as of October 2017

This time, I want to share my dotfiles of my new toys: zsh, tmux and vim at once. I’ve  found out what’s tmux actually, a couple of days ago by asking to a Telegram channel, @vimid. It’s “terminal multiplexer”, some kind of, it can break your single terminal session into multiple sessions.1 So, if I made use of Konsole tabs to use vim and php artisan serve of Laravel at a time then, now I just need tmux to run them concurrently.

Oh-my-zsh

What I know about zsh is not more than a console shell for macOS, before. Although, I did realize that it’s included in every Linux distributions as well. So, I thought I wouldn’t touch it no matter what. 😀

But this is my turning point to change my idealism. 😀 I just installed it, little bit configuring, and set it as bash replacement to Konsole. Umm, am I now look like a half macOS user? 😀

So, for zsh, I installed oh-my-zsh plugin and did some tweaks for the look of the prompt. I wanted a Powerline-like look, but I didn’t want to use Powerline. So, I installed powelevel9k theme instead. And now, I’m very satisfied, as it looks much nicer than my previous console.

Tmux

I don’t configure tmux much, since I just know it not that long. I thought it was just like bash or other console shells. As I had been trying it once, one day. I run it, and nothing appeared other than a command line shell. And I just realized how it works lately. 😀

In my config, I don’t do more than set default shell to zsh, and install tmux-powerline-theme with tpm.

Vim

As for vim, I have known it for quite long time. The first time I used it, like many developers out there, I didn’t know how to exit. 😀

But yeah, slowly but sure, I somehow have a little knowledge how to handle it. I have configured it quite seriously as I use it for my daily need: coding. But still, I’d say, I haven’t got its full usability yet, as I mentioned this before.  Just check out my .vimrc below, in case you so curious for what plugins I installed.


  1.  https://fedoramagazine.org/use-tmux-more-powerful-terminal/ 
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KDE: Like no other

I had lately just realized that I lost something crucial from KDE. Something that took me to love it, ’till now. It’s the built-in Hijra calendar system in Plasma desktop, which was included in (at least until) KDE SC 4.x.

kde9
Screenshot taken at a few years earlier

But, since KDE Plasma 5 rolled out, I was so excited for its fresh new look that I almost forgot about the Hijra calendar widget which I used to see. Perhaps it was still in beta phase, then. So, I didn’t take it into account. But, until now, it hasn’t appeared yet.

Then suddenly I wanted to switch KDE with any other DE in my Fedora because of the lack of Hijri calendar. I’ve tried –only– LXQt then. Still, GNOME is not my choice, I don’t know either. But it didn’t last longer. My soul has apparently been connected and felt comfort to KDE. It’s like irreplaceable in my heart. Just like you, my dear. 🙂

Hello, Vim!

Yeah, eventually I’ve got a chance to meet Vim more intensively from now on. Who is she? No worries! She is not a girl nor a lady. You’re still the one for me. 😀

“Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.” That’s how she describes herself. 1 So, basically Vim is a text editor. Period.

Then, comes a question, why Vim? Umm, frankly, it’s hot lately. I wonder how awesome it is. And yes, it is. Also, considering my needs of text (code) editing, and the hardware spec I have, I think Vim worth trying. Initially I have Atom, as I want something more legal than Sublime Text, that often (I mean always) remind me to purchase it. But with a lot of plugins I installed, it became more laggy. So I broke my idealism to avoid ST, and make use of it instead, until now sometimes. But ST is quite memory-greedy for my 2 gigs laptop, that I also regularly needs browser to run hand in hand while coding. I’m a coder by the way. 😀

Then the hero eventually came in. It’s Vim that now becomes my main text editor. Although I just already use it intensively since 2 or 3 weeks earlier. In other words, I am still getting used to it as a newbie Vim-er, of course. So I haven’t found it’s real hidden magic either. I’m sure with consistency and persistence, I’ll have it’s main enticement: productivity. And for now, I have to get along with her more. Wish me luck. 😀

Speaking of which, I use Vim in my Fedora KDE Spin, and run it in the beloved Konsole app. Here’s my screenshot of Vim.

Screenshot_20170816_101047.png
Vim with NERDTree plugin, makes it looks like GUI-based text editor with left pane

RPM Packaging tutorial for Fedora

Hi again! You might be surprised for I post this in less than 24 hours after the previous one, so did I. 😁

Here will I share my first ever experience on packaging an RPM package in Fedora Linux. Umm, actually not the first time though, as I have been trying this before, but I didn’t record it in my mind. I mean I forget when or how it was going. 😁 Continue reading RPM Packaging tutorial for Fedora

Choosing the best version of Fedora app packages

Downgrading is something that looks scary. Come to think of it: come back to the past is something everyone afraid of, right? 😀 Nevertheless, sometimes downgrading is the option we want to choose when the current app is not working well, and there is no option to upgrade.

Recently I had VLC in Fedora that cannot stream from my Raspberry Pi DLNA server. The server is not listed on the UPNP playlist. While when I try VLC in Android, it could see the server. In the debug log message (CTRL+M), there were a couple of error messages, something like upnp services discovery: Initializing libupnp on '(null)'.

And actually, the workaround is simple: there is a feature of DNF to downgrade the working version of packages. In this case, the newest version of VLC that I installed from COPR repo cannot work with the latest libupnp version. Then I have to downgrade it to the previous version which fortunately still working.

sudo dnf downgrade libupnp

screenshot_20161227_214622

Dealing with Fedora firewall configuration

Fedora includes and enables firewall rules set by default. I mean –as an end user opinion– it’s not the same as Ubuntu. When I was using Ubuntu, everything just works, no hassle caused by firewall. Then when the first time I tried Fedora, there are a few restrictions created by firewall configuration. I’m not really understand firewall, though. But soon I learnt it.

TL;DR, at least I’ve got 3 hurdles in dealing with Fedora firewall default config. They are blocked by the config, i.e

  • Samba Share
  • KDE Connect
  • VLC UPNP / DLNA

By then, I put them as whitelist apps to be allowed in the Firewalld config manager. Then this day, I look again, and actually I totally disable the firewalld of systemd.

sudo systemctl disable firewalld

Fedora KDE: Automount NTFS Partition at Login

I had a dual boot system: Windows and Ubuntu ever since I knew Linux world. So, I always have a separate partition to store files, which both OS can access them. The partition is always formatted with NTFS, something that’s not come from Linux world. Something like an alien for Linux, but has a good integration, since the Linux contributors gave support for NTFS partition. So, there’s no difficulty to read files in NTFS drive with Linux.

But, the problem comes when we want to ‘mount’ the drive / partition. It usually asks for a root password to mount. It’s not so convenient to type the password every time we mount the drive / partition, isn’t it?

“Hey, there is /etc/fstab out there.” You may think so. Oh, yeah, I almost forget this one. Actually we can set the partition to be automounted in every boot. But I don’t know why I avoided this approach since then.

So, I always use the automount option of Ubuntu instead. Ubuntu has the option to automount the drive/partition somewhere in the system settings if I remember correctly. After I switch to KDE desktop, I also found the option in the KDE systemsettings. So, I’ve got the partition to be automounted as soon as I log in to the plasma desktop.

A little trouble with Fedora

Now I also use Fedora in my daily basis. And I also choose KDE as the desktop. But, after a while, I found out that KDE was unable to automount the NTFS partition like Kubuntu did. Even though I have checked the option to ‘automount at login’, it still didn’t work.

fedora-automount

Then, a couple of days ago, I asked people in the #fedora-kde channel at Freenode IRC about my problem. Then a person with username ‘rdieter’ pointed about  ‘Privilege escalation’ in Fedora.

So, I just asked google about it, and it’s actually a piece of cake to find the best answer. I followed the instruction in AskFedora forum here. And it’s just work! Great! Here’s the workaround I managed to do automount partition in Fedora.

Follow the guide for Fedora 17, but the file should be saved to /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/99-mount-partitions.rules and its contents should be:

// Password-less mounting of local partitions
polkit.addRule(function(action, subject) {
    if (action.id == "org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-system" && subject.isInGroup("wheel")) {
       return polkit.Result.YES;
    }
});

The writer noted that it’s for Fedora 18, but the comment below it states that it’s also working for Fedora 22. And yes, so does Fedora 23. Now, Dolphin doesn’t ask for password when I click on the NTFS partition.