KDE: Like no other

I had lately just realized that I lost something crucial from KDE. Something that took me to love it, ’till now. It’s the built-in Hijra calendar system in Plasma desktop, which was included in (at least until) KDE SC 4.x.

kde9
Screenshot taken at a few years earlier

But, since KDE Plasma 5 rolled out, I was so excited for its fresh new look that I almost forgot about the Hijra calendar widget which I used to see. Perhaps it was still in beta phase, then. So, I didn’t take it into account. But, until now, it hasn’t appeared yet.

Then suddenly I wanted to switch KDE with any other DE in my Fedora because of the lack of Hijri calendar. I’ve tried –only– LXQt then. Still, GNOME is not my choice, I don’t know either. But it didn’t last longer. My soul has apparently been connected and felt comfort to KDE. It’s like irreplaceable in my heart. Just like you, my dear. 🙂

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KDE Plasma meets new dock

A few days earlier, I wanted a fresh look for my Plasma desktop, and I want a macOS-like interface. So, I googled for “dock” app for latest Plasma version. And eventually I ended up to choose Latte-Dock plasma widget. The last chance I customized KDE to resemble macOS look, I made use of Daisy plasma widget. But since it’s not developed any more for long time, I looked for another alternative, then here comes Latte-Dock.

As I use Fedora, I just have to run dnf install latte-dock to install it. Then I need to run it through app menu launcher to have it appears on the desktop. But actually I made mistake by adding its plasma widget manually via Add widgets of Plasma desktop. I didn’t get the settings I expected like in the tutorial I’ve found then. Yesterday I found a detailed article about Latte-Dock in this link (in German).

Once it launched, it will appear in the bottom screen of plasma desktop. We can add common plasma widgets in it, too, just like in the plasma panel. Also it can be customized by settings and tweak that it provides. For me, the default settings is enough, except for the animation that I cannot obtain due to the lack of performance of my video graphic driver.

In addition to dock app, I also move the default plasma panel to the top of screen. Then I removed the Icon-only Task Manager widget, and added Global Menu widget. Yeah, fortunately there is a global menu widget that is provided by Plasma desktop. But I also need to choose a settings somewhere in the system settings in order that the global menu widget shows application menu.

I also mixed and match other widgets to customize my plasma to look close enough like macOS. The final result is as follow:

Screenshot_20170910_093408
My KDE Plasma desktop as of September

 

Hello, Vim!

Yeah, eventually I’ve got a chance to meet Vim more intensively from now on. Who is she? No worries! She is not a girl nor a lady. You’re still the one for me. 😀

“Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.” That’s how she describes herself. 1 So, basically Vim is a text editor. Period.

Then, comes a question, why Vim? Umm, frankly, it’s hot lately. I wonder how awesome it is. And yes, it is. Also, considering my needs of text (code) editing, and the hardware spec I have, I think Vim worth trying. Initially I have Atom, as I want something more legal than Sublime Text, that often (I mean always) remind me to purchase it. But with a lot of plugins I installed, it became more laggy. So I broke my idealism to avoid ST, and make use of it instead, until now sometimes. But ST is quite memory-greedy for my 2 gigs laptop, that I also regularly needs browser to run hand in hand while coding. I’m a coder by the way. 😀

Then the hero eventually came in. It’s Vim that now becomes my main text editor. Although I just already use it intensively since 2 or 3 weeks earlier. In other words, I am still getting used to it as a newbie Vim-er, of course. So I haven’t found it’s real hidden magic either. I’m sure with consistency and persistence, I’ll have it’s main enticement: productivity. And for now, I have to get along with her more. Wish me luck. 😀

Speaking of which, I use Vim in my Fedora KDE Spin, and run it in the beloved Konsole app. Here’s my screenshot of Vim.

Screenshot_20170816_101047.png
Vim with NERDTree plugin, makes it looks like GUI-based text editor with left pane

Ubuntu Mate 16.04 ARM

I used to write about Kubuntu when its new version was released. But for now, since my HDD is rather broken, and I have bought Raspberry Pi instead, so I want to write about Mate flavor of Ubuntu which fit to the ARM platform. Actually I want to install KDE on it, but I’m not sure about the performance.

Last month, the new long-term supported Ubuntu version was released. The main flavor with Unity has not yet brought awaited Unity 8 with Mir display server. And for my favorite flavor, Kubuntu, it has brought the newest KDE Plasma 5 for the desktop. Unfortunately I cannot play with it until I repair my PC. Maybe not only repairing, but also I ought to buy a new HDD as well.

Continue reading Ubuntu Mate 16.04 ARM

Fedora KDE: Automount NTFS Partition at Login

I had a dual boot system: Windows and Ubuntu ever since I knew Linux world. So, I always have a separate partition to store files, which both OS can access them. The partition is always formatted with NTFS, something that’s not come from Linux world. Something like an alien for Linux, but has a good integration, since the Linux contributors gave support for NTFS partition. So, there’s no difficulty to read files in NTFS drive with Linux.

But, the problem comes when we want to ‘mount’ the drive / partition. It usually asks for a root password to mount. It’s not so convenient to type the password every time we mount the drive / partition, isn’t it?

“Hey, there is /etc/fstab out there.” You may think so. Oh, yeah, I almost forget this one. Actually we can set the partition to be automounted in every boot. But I don’t know why I avoided this approach since then.

So, I always use the automount option of Ubuntu instead. Ubuntu has the option to automount the drive/partition somewhere in the system settings if I remember correctly. After I switch to KDE desktop, I also found the option in the KDE systemsettings. So, I’ve got the partition to be automounted as soon as I log in to the plasma desktop.

A little trouble with Fedora

Now I also use Fedora in my daily basis. And I also choose KDE as the desktop. But, after a while, I found out that KDE was unable to automount the NTFS partition like Kubuntu did. Even though I have checked the option to ‘automount at login’, it still didn’t work.

fedora-automount

Then, a couple of days ago, I asked people in the #fedora-kde channel at Freenode IRC about my problem. Then a person with username ‘rdieter’ pointed about  ‘Privilege escalation’ in Fedora.

So, I just asked google about it, and it’s actually a piece of cake to find the best answer. I followed the instruction in AskFedora forum here. And it’s just work! Great! Here’s the workaround I managed to do automount partition in Fedora.

Follow the guide for Fedora 17, but the file should be saved to /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/99-mount-partitions.rules and its contents should be:

// Password-less mounting of local partitions
polkit.addRule(function(action, subject) {
    if (action.id == "org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-system" && subject.isInGroup("wheel")) {
       return polkit.Result.YES;
    }
});

The writer noted that it’s for Fedora 18, but the comment below it states that it’s also working for Fedora 22. And yes, so does Fedora 23. Now, Dolphin doesn’t ask for password when I click on the NTFS partition.

KDEConnect not Working in Fedora 23 KDE

I’ve just successfully connected KDE Connect in my Fedora 23 KDE to Android. Just before, I thought it didn’t work in Plasma 5 or broken in Fedora. Since it could not find the Android devices, although they have KDE Connect app installed. But actually, it’s just blocked by firewall config of Fedora.

According to KDE Wiki, the ports for kde-connect need to be opened, i.e 1714-1764. I’ve never thought that such essential part of the desktop environment would be blocked by firewall. So I had no idea to touch firewall config at all. It was until I found a discussion on Reddit about the same problem I had. A user pointing out about Fedora’s firewall that seems blocking kde-connect. But I could see the ports either TCP or UDP have been opened and listened in the firewall config. But then I found out that kde-connect was unchecked in the Services list.

It means that the firewall didn’t allow kde-connect to access the ports it needs. Then I just had to check it, typed password, and voila… my Android device has been found by kde-connect. So now, I can enjoy syncing Android to KDE and playing some stuffs it has.

References:
1. https://community.kde.org/KDEConnect#Troubleshooting
2. https://www.reddit.com/r/kde/comments/388fo0/kde_connect_fails_to_function/
3. http://www.bakalarczyk.com/posts/kde-connect-fw/

KDE Connect, Link Your Android to Linux Box

[Versi bahasa Indonesia ada di halaman 2]

Recently, I had a chance to try out KDE Connect. It has KDE in its name, but you can try it on other DEs. Of course with some limitations, i.e Dolphin’s right-click menu for sending files may not available on another file manager. (I haven’t try it on another DE, though). To link your Linux to Android, you need to have KDE Connect app installed on your Android and Linux as well, and connect both devices to the same network.

You can read all about KDE Connect in its developer’s blog: https://albertvaka.wordpress.com. And these are my screenshots of KDE Connect in action: