Learning Japanese N3 in a Fun Way

Wednesday is the day for learning Japanese in my schedule since about a year ago (actually I started writing this post in Wednesday). But unfortunately I didn’t put enough discipline for this. As a result, I missed the chance for entering the 2nd JLPT 2017 last month. Actually I have ever tried to learn by posting in Instagram, but it only last for once. There was a sort of awesome thing happened in my life, then. And it quite discouraged me to continue learning Japanese back then.

I have created a sort of cool hashtag for the schedule: #rabunihongo that has two meanings. It consists of two words: rabu and nihongo (Japanese), where rabu can mean both “Wednesday” in Indonesian and “love” in Japanese. So, it can have meaning “Wednesday Japanese” or “love Japanese”. Cool, no? 😀

I am so confident to learn Japanese more, as I have passed JLPT N5 in 2016, and I got a quite nice point on it. 🙂

Now I am so encouraged to continue to the next level: N3. And I have found a nice book for practicing. You can also purchase it from Amazon: Nihongo Noryokushiken taisaku Nihongo so matome

Learning in fun way

The fun way which I mean is by listening to Japanese songs and try to understand the meaning of the lyrics. My favorite J-Pop artist is Ikimono-gakari, a band of 3 members: Yoshioka Kiyoe, Yamashita Hotaka, and Yoshiki Mizuno. I love their songs. And here I will actually share one of their song: Last Scene. Actually I wanted to share Kimi ga iru for this very first post about this new theme in here. But I found the appropriate expression I need to share here only in the lyrics of Last Scene. Frankly speaking, I rather hated this one, since it’s quite sentimental and make you sad. Fyi, this song is the OST of my favorite Japanese movie: Shigatsu wa kimi no uso (live action). And it also became the last single of Ikimonogakari before they decided to take hiatus since the beginning of 2017 back then.

So, let’s get started to the first lesson of Nihongo sou matome. The first chapter title is “ganbaranakucha” (I have to stick at it). You can find the expression in the lyrics as: ねえ さよならをもう伝えなくちゃ (nee sayonara wo mou tsutaenakucha). It means “I have to tell you goodbye.”

Nakucha is another way you say nakereba narimasen which is more polite expression. It means shall, have to, must and it’s preceded by nai verb form. The other example how you use this expression can you find in Maggie-sensei’s website. I’m sorry but I have to leave you for now. Ikanakucha!

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It’s so much fun to “learn” German with Google Assistant, an Android app which is similar to Apple’s Siri. By saying “Okay google” to an Android device that has it installed, we can then ask anything. I don’t know whether it’s available to all device, though. Since I also rather surprised to find it installed on my phone. It must be included in the latest update of LineageOS which I use, and I updated it a couple of days ago.

Just have a look at the video how I had a humble conversation with the sort of artificial intelligent built by the largest tech company. Note that some are just jokes. 😀

Ich Lerne Deutsch mit Google Assistant