Installing openSUSE Krypton: an always-updated KDE distro

opensuse grub boot options

I think this is the most reasonable decision for me to install openSUSE (again in another device) in triple-boot with Fedora and Windows. Since I cannot abandon Fedora just like that, for it has created so many awesome memories. LOL, I’m joking. Actually I still have an on-going work in Fedora that I have no intention to move it to openSUSE. Besides, the LVM partition contents of Fedora where my data resides couldn’t be displayed by YaST when I installed openSUSE with Krypton Live ISO. So, I couldn’t just replace the Fedora root partition with openSUSE and then mount the separated home partition.

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The most time-consuming process is partitioning. I had to decide which partition should I “sacrifice” for openSUSE. I didn’t want resize existing partition and created one from it. So, the other option was to replace Fedora, but it’s kind of hard for me. Fortunately, there was a not-so-important NTFS partition and a “Windows recovery” partition that were fairly enough to use. So I came up with deleting both partition for the installation.

I was using Krypton live ISO which only 1 GB in size, unlike the official Tumbleweed ISO that has 4++ GB size. I thought that in such size, it would install only the essential software. But actually, since YaST asked for internet connection, it downloaded updates up to 4 GB! And during the download process, WiFi disconnected, which stopped the process.

Screenshot_20180218_032642After reconnecting a few times, eventually the download process continued. But, there were still some problems. There were some packages that failed to download. I was sure that during the installation, there were updates in the repo as well. As Krypton is always-updated KDE build, which means every single Git push, there will be updates available. So I skipped a few packages, and the installation could be finished. But, after I restarted the laptop and booted up to openSUSE, I got IceWM desktop instead. Yeah, it’s because the essential plasma-desktop and plasma-session were failed to download, or has been updated then.

Fortunately, YaST software installer recorded what missed out from the installation process. It suggested me to download the missing packages as soon as I open it for the first time. So after finishing the installation, I relogin, and finally KDE was here. Frankly, the desktop feels smoother than my Fedora. I wonder what causes it. Whether it’s relatively new installation or my Fedora KDE has been bloated with background programs. Let’s see if openSUSE will still like this until some time onward. 🙂

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Herzlich willkommen, OpenSUSE!

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Wait…! That desktop looks familiar. Have I ever met it before? Umm, maybe.

I suddenly remembered about OpenSUSE, which I once wanted to give it a try, as I wrote it somewhere in my other blog. And actually when I checked the post again, it was one and a half years ago. Then recently, I got encouraged (once again 😀 ) by kang Cip to try OpenSUSE out. And yes, I ended up installing it into my PC, eventually. Note that the screenshot above is just a live session. And here is the real installation result:

boot options screen

Dual boot options of OpenSUSE Leap and Windows

From the time I posted about my desire, it means that it took a quite long time for me to eventually install OpenSUSE. That’s the first time I played around with the YaST installer of this chameleon-logo Linux distro.

Continue reading “Herzlich willkommen, OpenSUSE!”

Oh-my-zsh, Tmux, Vim

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My Konsole as of October 2017

This time, I want to share my dotfiles of my new toys: zsh, tmux and vim at once. I’ve  found out what’s tmux actually, a couple of days ago by asking to a Telegram channel, @vimid. It’s “terminal multiplexer”, some kind of, it can break your single terminal session into multiple sessions.1 So, if I made use of Konsole tabs to use vim and php artisan serve of Laravel at a time then, now I just need tmux to run them concurrently.

Oh-my-zsh

What I know about zsh is not more than a console shell for macOS, before. Although, I did realize that it’s included in every Linux distributions as well. So, I thought I wouldn’t touch it no matter what. 😀

But this is my turning point to change my idealism. 😀 I just installed it, little bit configuring, and set it as bash replacement to Konsole. Umm, am I now look like a half macOS user? 😀

So, for zsh, I installed oh-my-zsh plugin and did some tweaks for the look of the prompt. I wanted a Powerline-like look, but I didn’t want to use Powerline. So, I installed powelevel9k theme instead. And now, I’m very satisfied, as it looks much nicer than my previous console.

Tmux

I don’t configure tmux much, since I just know it not that long. I thought it was just like bash or other console shells. As I had been trying it once, one day. I run it, and nothing appeared other than a command line shell. And I just realized how it works lately. 😀

In my config, I don’t do more than set default shell to zsh, and install tmux-powerline-theme with tpm.

Vim

As for vim, I have known it for quite long time. The first time I used it, like many developers out there, I didn’t know how to exit. 😀

But yeah, slowly but sure, I somehow have a little knowledge how to handle it. I have configured it quite seriously as I use it for my daily need: coding. But still, I’d say, I haven’t got its full usability yet, as I mentioned this before.  Just check out my .vimrc below, in case you so curious for what plugins I installed.


  1.  https://fedoramagazine.org/use-tmux-more-powerful-terminal/ 

Hello, Vim!

Yeah, eventually I’ve got a chance to meet Vim more intensively from now on. Who is she? No worries! She is not a girl nor a lady. You’re still the one for me. 😀

“Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.” That’s how she describes herself. 1 So, basically Vim is a text editor. Period.

Then, comes a question, why Vim? Umm, frankly, it’s hot lately. I wonder how awesome it is. And yes, it is. Also, considering my needs of text (code) editing, and the hardware spec I have, I think Vim worth trying. Initially I have Atom, as I want something more legal than Sublime Text, that often (I mean always) remind me to purchase it. But with a lot of plugins I installed, it became more laggy. So I broke my idealism to avoid ST, and make use of it instead, until now sometimes. But ST is quite memory-greedy for my 2 gigs laptop, that I also regularly needs browser to run hand in hand while coding. I’m a coder by the way. 😀

Then the hero eventually came in. It’s Vim that now becomes my main text editor. Although I just already use it intensively since 2 or 3 weeks earlier. In other words, I am still getting used to it as a newbie Vim-er, of course. So I haven’t found it’s real hidden magic either. I’m sure with consistency and persistence, I’ll have it’s main enticement: productivity. And for now, I have to get along with her more. Wish me luck. 😀

Speaking of which, I use Vim in my Fedora KDE Spin, and run it in the beloved Konsole app. Here’s my screenshot of Vim.

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Vim with NERDTree plugin, makes it looks like GUI-based text editor with left pane

Choosing the best version of Fedora app packages

Downgrading is something that looks scary. Come to think of it: come back to the past is something everyone afraid of, right? 😀 Nevertheless, sometimes downgrading is the option we want to choose when the current app is not working well, and there is no option to upgrade.

Recently I had VLC in Fedora that cannot stream from my Raspberry Pi DLNA server. The server is not listed on the UPNP playlist. While when I try VLC in Android, it could see the server. In the debug log message (CTRL+M), there were a couple of error messages, something like upnp services discovery: Initializing libupnp on '(null)'.

And actually, the workaround is simple: there is a feature of DNF to downgrade the working version of packages. In this case, the newest version of VLC that I installed from COPR repo cannot work with the latest libupnp version. Then I have to downgrade it to the previous version which fortunately still working.

sudo dnf downgrade libupnp

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Dealing with Fedora firewall configuration

Fedora includes and enables firewall rules set by default. I mean –as an end user opinion– it’s not the same as Ubuntu. When I was using Ubuntu, everything just works, no hassle caused by firewall. Then when the first time I tried Fedora, there are a few restrictions created by firewall configuration. I’m not really understand firewall, though. But soon I learnt it.

TL;DR, at least I’ve got 3 hurdles in dealing with Fedora firewall default config. They are blocked by the config, i.e

  • Samba Share
  • KDE Connect
  • VLC UPNP / DLNA

By then, I put them as whitelist apps to be allowed in the Firewalld config manager. Then this day, I look again, and actually I totally disable the firewalld of systemd.

sudo systemctl disable firewalld