Choosing the best version of Fedora app packages

Downgrading is something that¬†looks scary. Come to think of it: come back to the past is something everyone afraid of, right? ūüėĬ†Nevertheless, sometimes downgrading is the option we want to choose when the current app is not working well, and there is no option to upgrade.

Recently I had VLC in Fedora that cannot stream from my Raspberry Pi DLNA server. The server is not listed on the UPNP playlist. While when I try VLC in Android, it could see the server. In the debug log message (CTRL+M), there were a couple of error messages, something like upnp services discovery: Initializing libupnp on '(null)'.

And actually, the workaround is simple: there is a feature of DNF to downgrade the working version of packages. In this case, the newest version of VLC that I installed from COPR repo cannot work with the latest libupnp version. Then I have to downgrade it to the previous version which fortunately still working.

sudo dnf downgrade libupnp

screenshot_20161227_214622

Dealing with Fedora firewall configuration

Fedora includes and enables firewall rules set by default. I mean –as¬†an end user opinion– it’s not the same as Ubuntu. When I¬†was using Ubuntu, everything just works, no hassle caused by firewall. Then when the first time I tried Fedora, there are a few restrictions created by firewall configuration. I’m not really understand firewall, though. But soon I learnt it.

TL;DR, at least I’ve got 3 hurdles in dealing with Fedora firewall default config. They are blocked by the config, i.e

  • Samba Share
  • KDE Connect
  • VLC UPNP / DLNA

By then, I put them as whitelist apps to be allowed in the Firewalld config manager. Then this day, I look again, and actually I totally disable the firewalld of systemd.

sudo systemctl disable firewalld

Fedora KDE: Automount NTFS Partition at Login

I had a dual boot system: Windows and Ubuntu ever since I knew Linux world. So, I always have a separate partition to store files, which both OS can access them. The partition is always formatted with NTFS, something that’s not come from Linux world. Something like an alien for Linux, but has a good integration, since the Linux contributors gave support for NTFS partition. So, there’s no difficulty to read files in NTFS drive with Linux.

But, the problem comes when we want to ‘mount’ the drive / partition. It usually asks for a root password to mount. It’s not so convenient to type the password every time we mount the drive / partition, isn’t it?

“Hey, there is /etc/fstab out there.” You may think so. Oh, yeah, I almost forget this one. Actually we can set the partition to be automounted in every boot. But I don’t know why I avoided this approach since then.

So, I always use the automount option of Ubuntu instead. Ubuntu has the option to automount the drive/partition somewhere in the system settings if I remember correctly. After I switch to KDE desktop, I also found the option in the KDE systemsettings. So, I’ve got the partition to be automounted as soon as I log in to the plasma desktop.

A little trouble with Fedora

Now I also use Fedora in my daily basis. And I also choose KDE as the desktop. But, after a while, I found out that KDE was unable to automount the NTFS partition like Kubuntu did. Even though I¬†have checked the option to ‘automount at login’, it still didn’t work.

fedora-automount

Then, a couple of days ago, I asked people in the #fedora-kde channel at Freenode IRC about my problem. Then a person with username ‘rdieter’ pointed about ¬†‘Privilege escalation’ in Fedora.

So, I just asked google about it, and it’s actually a piece of cake to find the best answer. I followed the instruction in AskFedora forum here. And it’s just work! Great! Here’s the workaround I managed to do automount partition in Fedora.

Follow the guide for Fedora 17, but the file should be saved to /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/99-mount-partitions.rules and its contents should be:

// Password-less mounting of local partitions
polkit.addRule(function(action, subject) {
    if (action.id == "org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-system" && subject.isInGroup("wheel")) {
       return polkit.Result.YES;
    }
});

The writer noted that it’s for Fedora 18, but the comment below it states that it’s also working for Fedora 22. And yes, so does¬†Fedora 23. Now, Dolphin doesn’t ask for password when I click on the NTFS partition.

It’s so easy to connect Raspbian Lite to WiFi

raspbian-lite-connect-wifi

This month, I’ve got a chance to try¬†Raspberry Pi device. I’ve got the Pi 2 model B from Jakarta Notebook offline store in Semarang. I am going to make it as a home server (actually workspace server ūüėÄ ). Right now, there’s a router here that is connected to internet. But unfortunately, I don’t have sufficient LAN cable to connect Pi to the router. So, I make use of a Ralink USB WiFi adapter for Pi to connect. And actually, set it up via command line is not hard as I thought.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/wireless/wireless-cli.md

Making Kinetic Typography in Linux

Kinetic typography is an animation technique for moving text in certain ways. It became quite popular since a few years earlier. There are so many tutorials out there how to do kinetic typography. Almost all of them are created with After Effects (AE).

As a part of OpenSource community, I have once wondered, was there exist a similar program to do kinetic typography that runs on Linux? The answer is, yes of course, but not as powerful as AE. Actually, I’ve found Synfig Studio that has a close functionality to AE to produce kinetic typography. But, basically Synfig is a 2D animation software. Therefore, I cannot compare it with AE, after all.

TL;DR, this is a tutorial I’ve found in Youtube to do kinetic typography in Linux

And this is my rendered video

Auto build Launchpad Project on Commit

If you have a project hosted on Canonical’s Launchpad, then you have a choice to build it as soon as you push its Bazaar commit. The automatic build process is conducted by a “recipe”. Cited from official explanation, there are two options for when recipes get built:

Built daily
A build will be scheduled automatically once a change in any of the branches used in the recipe is detected.
Built on request
Builds of the recipe have to be manually requested using the “Request build” action.

You can create a recipe from project page, and look for “Create packaging recipe”. Then you need to choose the “Built daily” option to automatically build the DEB binary from source when you push the commit.

Build recipe Launchpad Canonical Ubuntu
Build recipe Launchpad Canonical Ubuntu

Then you can compose the packaging recipe by refering to the official documentation here: https://help.launchpad.net/Packaging/SourceBuilds/Recipes

How to Block Device on OpenWRT Based on MAC Address

If you have an OpenWRT router, sometimes you need to block particular devices from accessing internet yet still can connect to its Wi-fi network. We can do that easily from the LUCI web-UI control panel.

Head for menu Network > Firewall.
openwrt1

There you can make a new firewall rule. Give it a name in New forward rule section. Then click Add and edit.
openwrt2

Then you have to choose the device’s MAC address to block.
openwrt3

Then choose option Reject in the Action dropdown list.
openwrt4

Then click Save and apply. Make sure you have the new rule is listed in the rules list.
openwrt5