Oh-my-zsh, Tmux, Vim

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My Konsole as of October 2017

This time, I want to share my dotfiles of my new toys: zsh, tmux and vim at once. I’ve  found out what’s tmux actually, a couple of days ago by asking to a Telegram channel, @vimid. It’s “terminal multiplexer”, some kind of, it can break your single terminal session into multiple sessions.1 So, if I made use of Konsole tabs to use vim and php artisan serve of Laravel at a time then, now I just need tmux to run them concurrently.

Oh-my-zsh

What I know about zsh is not more than a console shell for macOS, before. Although, I did realize that it’s included in every Linux distributions as well. So, I thought I wouldn’t touch it no matter what. 😀

But this is my turning point to change my idealism. 😀 I just installed it, little bit configuring, and set it as bash replacement to Konsole. Umm, am I now look like a half macOS user? 😀

So, for zsh, I installed oh-my-zsh plugin and did some tweaks for the look of the prompt. I wanted a Powerline-like look, but I didn’t want to use Powerline. So, I installed powelevel9k theme instead. And now, I’m very satisfied, as it looks much nicer than my previous console.

Tmux

I don’t configure tmux much, since I just know it not that long. I thought it was just like bash or other console shells. As I had been trying it once, one day. I run it, and nothing appeared other than a command line shell. And I just realized how it works lately. 😀

In my config, I don’t do more than set default shell to zsh, and install tmux-powerline-theme with tpm.

Vim

As for vim, I have known it for quite long time. The first time I used it, like many developers out there, I didn’t know how to exit. 😀

But yeah, slowly but sure, I somehow have a little knowledge how to handle it. I have configured it quite seriously as I use it for my daily need: coding. But still, I’d say, I haven’t got its full usability yet, as I mentioned this before.  Just check out my .vimrc below, in case you so curious for what plugins I installed.


  1.  https://fedoramagazine.org/use-tmux-more-powerful-terminal/ 
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KDE Plasma meets new dock

A few days earlier, I wanted a fresh look for my Plasma desktop, and I want a macOS-like interface. So, I googled for “dock” app for latest Plasma version. And eventually I ended up to choose Latte-Dock plasma widget. The last chance I customized KDE to resemble macOS look, I made use of Daisy plasma widget. But since it’s not developed any more for long time, I looked for another alternative, then here comes Latte-Dock.

As I use Fedora, I just have to run dnf install latte-dock to install it. Then I need to run it through app menu launcher to have it appears on the desktop. But actually I made mistake by adding its plasma widget manually via Add widgets of Plasma desktop. I didn’t get the settings I expected like in the tutorial I’ve found then. Yesterday I found a detailed article about Latte-Dock in this link (in German).

Once it launched, it will appear in the bottom screen of plasma desktop. We can add common plasma widgets in it, too, just like in the plasma panel. Also it can be customized by settings and tweak that it provides. For me, the default settings is enough, except for the animation that I cannot obtain due to the lack of performance of my video graphic driver.

In addition to dock app, I also move the default plasma panel to the top of screen. Then I removed the Icon-only Task Manager widget, and added Global Menu widget. Yeah, fortunately there is a global menu widget that is provided by Plasma desktop. But I also need to choose a settings somewhere in the system settings in order that the global menu widget shows application menu.

I also mixed and match other widgets to customize my plasma to look close enough like macOS. The final result is as follow:

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My KDE Plasma desktop as of September