Installing Openshift Origin on Digitalocean Droplet

Lately I wondered why my websites as well as the backend for my app (also available for Android) were so slow that the app was hardly usable. By wondering, I mean, I did’t get it, what’s happened in the underlying service, Openshift Online Starter v3. Actually I knew the cause, which was made by myself though. ๐Ÿ˜€

I was experimenting with SSL setup in the routes settings of Openshift project configuration page. There are 3 options for the secure route, Edge Termination, Passthrough Termination, Re-encrypt Termination, which are described on the official documentation page here. I have played with all those options, and the results were very very slow download speed, or maybe just the TTL. I had secure route to be activated for one of my subdomain need SSL, which was then to be paired with Full SSL option in CloudFlare. Yeah, I make use of it for the DNS server anyway. And as for SSL certificates for the Openshift route, I obtained it from Cloudflare’s. So, it’s obvious that there was a communication issue between them, particularly at SSL handshake session. Although, according to a comment for my question on Stackoverflow, he said that it’s a known issue on Openshift itself.

So, rather than disabling SSL for the sake of website speed, I was planning to move the data to traditional hosting, or VPS. I tended to choose the latter, as I have enough credit in Digitalocean right now. But, as I quite lazy to setup production server on a bare VPS, and my project was customized for Openshift, I’d rather searching for how to setup Openshift Origin on DigitalOcean. In the first run, I set up a Fedora Atomic droplet, that actually I didn’t understand what it was. ๐Ÿ˜€ Thanks to buddies on @FedoraID telegram group, I quite enlightened about it now. ๐Ÿ™‚

Eventually, I found a thorough tutorial how to setup Openshift Origin on VPS. So, here I just want to share some screenshots of my success on setting it up. ๐Ÿ™‚ FYI, it only took 2 hours for me to play around with it on Digitalocean droplet, as I realized that a 512 MB droplet would not sufficient to run Openshift service in it, as it encountered sudden stop so often due to the lack of memory.

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Low resource (memory) on a half gig droplet

 

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Farewell OpenShift 2

It’s 3 days after the End of Life of OpenShift 2. As I posted earlier about the notice, I had migrated my little app to its next generation: OpenShift Online 3. My app is the basis of my personal website and theย backend of my Android app. So it’s kind of a must for me to migrate it as soon as possible. And actually I did it successfully last week.

As I deploy it by Git, I still have the source repository. So, I don’t care of the deployed one on the OpenShift. But, once I received an email from OpenShift about the “one time exception” to allow me to backup the data even after its end of life, I think it’s worth trying. ๐Ÿ˜€

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So, I just followed the guide from attached link. Then a few moments after I typed rhc snapshot save php, I got my deployed source of the app, including error logs of Nginx and PHP.

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And now I feel so relieve of the data –if it will be deleted forever. Farewell, my –prior– app.

This is ephemeral world, after all

Hi my blog audience, it’s been a long time I didn’t write here, did I? Actually there was nothing weird nor wrong here. I just quite discouraged to write posts in English then. For I have decided to fill this WordPress blog with English posts only. And in fact, I am still learning English as well, so you may find some glitches in this post and few others earlier.

A few days ago, more precisely on August 25, OpenShift by RedHat emailed me and many other developers around the world. They announced something tragic news, that they would suspend their valuable OpenShift online v.2. And it’s going to happen just in a month ahead (September 30, 2017). It’s kind of surprising and overwhelming, as we have to migrate our production apps that run on OpenShift into the newer generation of it that we might haven’t given it try yet. Continue reading “This is ephemeral world, after all”