It’s Budgie desktop in Fedora 28. Yeah, actually it’s quite pretty neat, and lightweight!

I think I have to switch desktop in this Fedora installation in my laptop, because it feels quite laggy with KDE, although when I boot to openSUSE, it’s not so. I’ve realized that the best distro that makes great KDE configurations is openSUSE, not Fedora. I’m sorry to say that, but that’s what I got so far. Fedora, I’m sure, is great in Gnome 3 support, as it is the default desktop for Fedora Workstation. But, I’m not too interested to give Gnome 3 a try as for now.

So, instead of Gnome 3, I got interested to Budgie desktop of Solus project. I was wondering its lightweight as often discussed on @fedoraid Telegram group, especially by bro @alunux. And actually, he is the one –maybe the only as well– who provides a COPR repo of Budgie desktop for Fedora. And of course I install it from there. Thanks buddy @alunux. 😀 Keep it on!

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Budgie desktop in KDE flavor

Setting up Magento Local Development in openSUSE

Screenshot_20180301_103321

Finally, I managed to install Magento in my local environment of openSUSE. It’s quite tricky to get it up and running. It’s mainly due to filesystem permissions issue, as well as Apache virtual host configuration. I don’t have many experience with Apache, so it took more time to configure the virtual host. Because I prefer LEMP stack, and since a couple of months ago, I use Docker for local development environment instead.

Actually, I have successfully installed it in Fedora as well. But, I delete the installation due to the low disk capacity. The overall steps I did to eventually get Magento served in my localhost are:

  1. Downloading Magento from its official website, and I had to log in first, I downloaded the latest version (2.3)
  2. Installing the prerequisites as described in Magento dev docs, I got a little trouble to fulfill the minimum requirements, i.e. PHP version and extensions. openSUSE Tumbleweed has PHP v 7.2 in the main repo, but Magento didn’t support this version, so I used other repo to install v 7.1. But the issue hasn’t stopped, as that repo didn’t have php-mcrypt package. So I had to download the RPM from somewhere (likely rpmfind.net) which had the nearly compatible version.
  3. Configuring Apache in localhost, where I struggled to get the right configuration
  4. Extracting the Magento tarball and setting filesystem permissions. Actually this step was the hardest phase, although I had followed the instruction from official Magento website.
  5. Running the installation step. Since I didn’t get the right configuration of filesystem permissions, so that the front end installer didn’t show up, I used the Magento command line installer module instead. It’s quite tricky as well, actually. But it worked.
  6. Setting up PHP session directory permission manually. As I put the Magento source files in my home partition, and Apache run as wwwrun user, it cannot access the PHP session directory to write a new session. Actually Magento can make use of other session handler system like memcached and redis, but I didn’t find the corresponding packages in the custom zypper repo I mentioned before.

This is the final result of the installation of Magento in my openSUSE.

Magento dashboard

Screenshot_20180301_223633

my command line history

Installing openSUSE Krypton: an always-updated KDE distro

opensuse grub boot options

I think this is the most reasonable decision for me to install openSUSE (again in another device) in triple-boot with Fedora and Windows. Since I cannot abandon Fedora just like that, for it has created so many awesome memories. LOL, I’m joking. Actually I still have an on-going work in Fedora that I have no intention to move it to openSUSE. Besides, the LVM partition contents of Fedora where my data resides couldn’t be displayed by YaST when I installed openSUSE with Krypton Live ISO. So, I couldn’t just replace the Fedora root partition with openSUSE and then mount the separated home partition.

Screenshot_20180217_203552

The most time-consuming process is partitioning. I had to decide which partition should I “sacrifice” for openSUSE. I didn’t want resize existing partition and created one from it. So, the other option was to replace Fedora, but it’s kind of hard for me. Fortunately, there was a not-so-important NTFS partition and a “Windows recovery” partition that were fairly enough to use. So I came up with deleting both partition for the installation.

I was using Krypton live ISO which only 1 GB in size, unlike the official Tumbleweed ISO that has 4++ GB size. I thought that in such size, it would install only the essential software. But actually, since YaST asked for internet connection, it downloaded updates up to 4 GB! And during the download process, WiFi disconnected, which stopped the process.

Screenshot_20180218_032642After reconnecting a few times, eventually the download process continued. But, there were still some problems. There were some packages that failed to download. I was sure that during the installation, there were updates in the repo as well. As Krypton is always-updated KDE build, which means every single Git push, there will be updates available. So I skipped a few packages, and the installation could be finished. But, after I restarted the laptop and booted up to openSUSE, I got IceWM desktop instead. Yeah, it’s because the essential plasma-desktop and plasma-session were failed to download, or has been updated then.

Fortunately, YaST software installer recorded what missed out from the installation process. It suggested me to download the missing packages as soon as I open it for the first time. So after finishing the installation, I relogin, and finally KDE was here. Frankly, the desktop feels smoother than my Fedora. I wonder what causes it. Whether it’s relatively new installation or my Fedora KDE has been bloated with background programs. Let’s see if openSUSE will still like this until some time onward. 🙂

Herzlich willkommen, OpenSUSE!

Screenshot_20180204_085137

Wait…! That desktop looks familiar. Have I ever met it before? Umm, maybe.

I suddenly remembered about OpenSUSE, which I once wanted to give it a try, as I wrote it somewhere in my other blog. And actually when I checked the post again, it was one and a half years ago. Then recently, I got encouraged (once again 😀 ) by kang Cip to try OpenSUSE out. And yes, I ended up installing it into my PC, eventually. Note that the screenshot above is just a live session. And here is the real installation result:

boot options screen

Dual boot options of OpenSUSE Leap and Windows

From the time I posted about my desire, it means that it took a quite long time for me to eventually install OpenSUSE. That’s the first time I played around with the YaST installer of this chameleon-logo Linux distro.

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