Ubuntu Mate 16.04 ARM

I used to write about Kubuntu when its new version was released. But for now, since my HDD is rather broken, and I have bought Raspberry Pi instead, so I want to write about Mate flavor of Ubuntu which fit to the ARM platform. Actually I want to install KDE on it, but I’m not sure about the performance.

Last month, the new long-term supported Ubuntu version was released. The main flavor with Unity has not yet brought awaited Unity 8 with Mir display server. And for my favorite flavor, Kubuntu, it has brought the newest KDE Plasma 5 for the desktop. Unfortunately I cannot play with it until I repair my PC. Maybe not only repairing, but also I ought to buy a new HDD as well.

Continue reading Ubuntu Mate 16.04 ARM

Odoo on Raspbian: Solving Wkhtmltopdf Error Code -6

Odoo is an open source ERP application for business, formerly known as OpenERP. Its core is Python and using PostgreSQL for the database. It’s a web-based app, so that you can install it on a server capable machine. In this case, I talk about Raspberry Pi 2, installed Raspbian Jessie.

By following a brief tutorial from here, I was successfully getting Odoo running on Raspberry Pi 2. But it still had a little glitch: when I want to create PDF report, it threw error:

 Wkhtmltopdf failed (error code: -6). Message: The switch –header-spacing, is not support using unpatched qt and will be ignored.The switch –header-html, is not support using unpatched qt, and will be ignored.The switch –footer-html, is not support using unpatched qt, and will be ignored.QXcbConnection: Could not connect to display. Continue reading Odoo on Raspbian: Solving Wkhtmltopdf Error Code -6

Fedora KDE: Automount NTFS Partition at Login

I had a dual boot system: Windows and Ubuntu ever since I knew Linux world. So, I always have a separate partition to store files, which both OS can access them. The partition is always formatted with NTFS, something that’s not come from Linux world. Something like an alien for Linux, but has a good integration, since the Linux contributors gave support for NTFS partition. So, there’s no difficulty to read files in NTFS drive with Linux.

But, the problem comes when we want to ‘mount’ the drive / partition. It usually asks for a root password to mount. It’s not so convenient to type the password every time we mount the drive / partition, isn’t it?

“Hey, there is /etc/fstab out there.” You may think so. Oh, yeah, I almost forget this one. Actually we can set the partition to be automounted in every boot. But I don’t know why I avoided this approach since then.

So, I always use the automount option of Ubuntu instead. Ubuntu has the option to automount the drive/partition somewhere in the system settings if I remember correctly. After I switch to KDE desktop, I also found the option in the KDE systemsettings. So, I’ve got the partition to be automounted as soon as I log in to the plasma desktop.

A little trouble with Fedora

Now I also use Fedora in my daily basis. And I also choose KDE as the desktop. But, after a while, I found out that KDE was unable to automount the NTFS partition like Kubuntu did. Even though I have checked the option to ‘automount at login’, it still didn’t work.

fedora-automount

Then, a couple of days ago, I asked people in the #fedora-kde channel at Freenode IRC about my problem. Then a person with username ‘rdieter’ pointed about  ‘Privilege escalation’ in Fedora.

So, I just asked google about it, and it’s actually a piece of cake to find the best answer. I followed the instruction in AskFedora forum here. And it’s just work! Great! Here’s the workaround I managed to do automount partition in Fedora.

Follow the guide for Fedora 17, but the file should be saved to /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/99-mount-partitions.rules and its contents should be:

// Password-less mounting of local partitions
polkit.addRule(function(action, subject) {
    if (action.id == "org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-system" && subject.isInGroup("wheel")) {
       return polkit.Result.YES;
    }
});

The writer noted that it’s for Fedora 18, but the comment below it states that it’s also working for Fedora 22. And yes, so does Fedora 23. Now, Dolphin doesn’t ask for password when I click on the NTFS partition.

Resolving Git hooks error: unable to unlink old ‘filename’ (permission denied)

This article will teach you how to use Git when you want to deploy your application. While there are many ways to use Git to deploy our application, this tutorial will focus on the one that is most straightforward. I assume you already know how to create and use a repository on your local machine.

I was following the tutorial to setup a Git server on Raspberry Pi1. Then I continued to setup automatic deployment with Git from above article 2.

The setup was going well, until I tried to commit new changes and then pushed it to the Pi server. I got a bunch of errors produced by post-receive hook script, similar like these:

remote: error: unable to unlink old 'filename' (Permission denied)

git-push-error-unlink Continue reading Resolving Git hooks error: unable to unlink old ‘filename’ (permission denied)

It’s so easy to connect Raspbian Lite to WiFi

raspbian-lite-connect-wifi

This month, I’ve got a chance to try Raspberry Pi device. I’ve got the Pi 2 model B from Jakarta Notebook offline store in Semarang. I am going to make it as a home server (actually workspace server😀 ). Right now, there’s a router here that is connected to internet. But unfortunately, I don’t have sufficient LAN cable to connect Pi to the router. So, I make use of a Ralink USB WiFi adapter for Pi to connect. And actually, set it up via command line is not hard as I thought.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/wireless/wireless-cli.md

Setting Up fcitx-mozc in Fedora 23 KDE

こんにちは。今回のテーマは『Fedora 23に日本語入力fcitx-mozcを導入する』です。最近はLinuxでの日本語入力としてfcitx-mozcの人気がジワジワ高まっているように感じます。

Recently, Mozc, Japanese input methode engine by Google become more popular, compared with Anthy, so does fcitx upon ibus. In the official repository of Fedora, there’s fcitx-anthy, but unfortunately, there’s no fcitx-mozc yet.

Here I will wrap up the workaround for those who want to use fcitx-mozc in Fedora 23. Be careful, that you take responsible of all risks that may happen, as it may lead to dependency hell. Basically, you are going to get favor from OpenSUSE as it has provided fcitx-mozc. You need 3 packages to be downloaded: fcitx-mozc, mozc, and mozc-gui-tools.

  1. Download those 3 packages from https://software.opensuse.org/421/en, select “more version” link, under Direct install button, there you can choose the package version and system architecture, whether 32 bit or 64 bit
    fedora31
  2. Remove ibus-mozc and mozc if already installed via command sudo dnf remove ibus-mozc mozc
  3. Install fcitx if it’s not installed yet, sudo dnf install fcitx kcm-fcitx
  4. Then install the previously downloaded packages via console. sudo dnf install fcitx-mozc.rpm fcitx-gui-tools.rpm mozc.rpm
    fedora33
  5. Once it successfully installed, you can set the default input method to fcitx-mozc via system settings.
    fedora34
    at the left list, you may have to uncheck the option “Only show the current language” to show Mozc and move to the right. Apply the settings and just relogin to Plasma to take effect and see the fcitx icon at the taskbar below.

via Fedora 23に日本語入力fcitx-mozcを導入する.

KDEConnect not Working in Fedora 23 KDE

I’ve just successfully connected KDE Connect in my Fedora 23 KDE to Android. Just before, I thought it didn’t work in Plasma 5 or broken in Fedora. Since it could not find the Android devices, although they have KDE Connect app installed. But actually, it’s just blocked by firewall config of Fedora.

According to KDE Wiki, the ports for kde-connect need to be opened, i.e 1714-1764. I’ve never thought that such essential part of the desktop environment would be blocked by firewall. So I had no idea to touch firewall config at all. It was until I found a discussion on Reddit about the same problem I had. A user pointing out about Fedora’s firewall that seems blocking kde-connect. But I could see the ports either TCP or UDP have been opened and listened in the firewall config. But then I found out that kde-connect was unchecked in the Services list.

It means that the firewall didn’t allow kde-connect to access the ports it needs. Then I just had to check it, typed password, and voila… my Android device has been found by kde-connect. So now, I can enjoy syncing Android to KDE and playing some stuffs it has.

References:
1. https://community.kde.org/KDEConnect#Troubleshooting
2. https://www.reddit.com/r/kde/comments/388fo0/kde_connect_fails_to_function/
3. http://www.bakalarczyk.com/posts/kde-connect-fw/